Denisha Champion, Ph.D., LCMHCS

Director, University Counseling Center
NC Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor- Supervisor

Pronouns: she/her/hers
counselingcenter@wfu.edu

Education and Training
Clemson University (B.A., Communication Studies)
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (M.S., Counseling)
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (Ph.D., Counseling and Counselor Education)
Internship: Wake Forest University Counseling Center

Clinical Interests
Multicultural/Multi-ethnic concerns; Issues affecting students of color; Substance abuse and prevention; Wellness, Mindfulness, and Holistic health; Eating concerns; Family relationships; Counselor education and supervision. The presenting concerns I typically work with include anxiety, depression, family relationship concerns, disordered eating, identity concerns, issues of race and ethnicity, as well as individuals seeking counseling for personal growth and development.

Counseling Style
My counseling style integrates a blend of interpersonal and cognitive behavioral therapy in order to help students explore the connection between their thoughts and emotional experiences. My clinical experience has been primarily college student developmental concerns; and I have also done clinical work in substance abuse outside of the university setting.

Personal
I grew up in South Carolina and love the warmth of the south. When I’m not doing my life’s passion of helping students deal with personal concerns and reach their goals; I can be found dancing it out in a Zumba class,  breathing it out in Bikram yoga,  or at a spa. I love trying to recreate the comfort foods my southern grandmothers made and visiting friends spread across the country.


Daniel Paredes, Ph.D., NCC, LCMHCS

Associate Director Clinical Services
NC Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor-Supervisor
Pronouns: he/him/his
parededm@wfu.edu

Education and Training
University of California at San Diego (B.A., Psychology)
University of North Carolina at Greensboro (M.S., Community Counseling)
University of North Carolina at Greensboro (Ph.D., Counseling and Counselor Education)
Internships: Moses Cone Behavioral Health Center; University of North Carolina at Greensboro Counseling and Testing Center

Clinical Interests
College/university counseling; counselor training; crisis counseling; identity development; multi/cross-cultural counseling; substance abuse counseling; technology use in counseling; and wellness. I have served as a visiting assistant professor in the UNC at Greensboro Department of Counseling and Educational Development.

Counseling Style
I identify as an Adlerian with respect to my understanding of how we develop a framework to relate to others and the world in general. In session, I draw heavily from Person-Centered Counseling and cognitively oriented theories (CBT, REBT, Reality Therapy, SFBT). Based on client needs, I also sometimes invite clients to explore existential and spiritual identities as a means to understanding problem etiology and resolution.

Personal
When I am not working, I’m spending time with my wonderful family or indulging my hobbies. I tend to gravitate towards hobbies that lead to concrete results so I like to work on cars, running, and cooking. I acknowledged a long time ago that I am what many would consider a geek – indeed even before it was en vogue to be one.


Lasheka D. Allen, Ph.D.

Staff Psychologist
Pronouns: she/her/hers
allenl@wfu.edu

Education & Training
North Carolina Central University (BA Psychology)
North Carolina Central University (BS Family & Consumer Sciences)
North Carolina Central University (MA Psychology)
Prairie View A&M University (MS Clinical Psychology)
Prairie View A&M University (PhD Clinical Psychology)
Doctoral Internship: Easterseals Rehabilitation Center Department of Psychology & Wellness

Clinical Interests:
Trauma-informed care, minoritized populations, marginalized populations, emerging adults, international students, families, evidenced based interventions, supervision and training.

Counseling Style:
I approach each session with an integrated person-centered focus. Theoretically, I believe that our early experiences not only shape our personality development but give insight to our present. I value research informed care through cognitive-behavioral intervention paired with cultural humility. As a proponent of the scientist-practitioner model I implement evidence-based programs that target diverse groups, encourage proactive care for prevention, quality treatment, reduction of mental health crises, and promote wellness.  I seek to explore the risk and protective factors in systems that impact treatment seeking behaviors and engagement in wellness services. I work to help minoritized and marginalized group members overcome the barriers to mental health services. Furthermore, I endorse collaborative teams to address clients’ needs because the team approach enhances continuity of care and quality of care.

Personal:
I find joy in spending time with my loved ones, engaging in self-care, and mentoring. On an ideal day you will find me shopping the best sales, listening to soulful music, reading, traveling, and enjoying great food.


Charlotte Brown

Charlotte Orsborn, B.S.

Administrative Assistant
Pronouns: she/her/hers
brownc@wfu.edu

Education: Western Carolina University (B.A., Psychology)

Professional: Administrative Assistant for the University Counseling Center.

Personal: I grew up about a thirty minute drive west of Winston-Salem but lived in the mountains of North Carolina for ten years. I enjoy hiking, traveling, crafting, binge watching Netflix with my two cats, and the occasional video game and comic convention.


Tiffany Longjohn

Tiffany Longjohn, M.S., LCMHC

Assistant Director, Community Engagement
NC Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor
Pronouns: she/her/hers
longjot@wfu.edu

Education and Training
University of Central Florida (B. S. in Elementary Education)
University of North Carolina- Greensboro (M. S. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling)
Internships: Youth Focus Outpatient, Youth Focus Structured Day, Vacc Counseling & Consulting Clinic

Clinical Interests
Depression; Anxiety; Interpersonal Relationships; Distress Tolerance; Stress Management; Self-esteem; Multicultural concerns; Wellness; Advocacy; Prevention; Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Counseling Style
Counseling can be both a rewarding and difficult experience for some. With that being said, I try to create a safe space for individuals to explore different parts of themselves and develop a set of skills that will help them continue to be successful. I primarily use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Solution-Focused Therapy in my work with others.  However, I value being able to explore different theoretical frameworks as needed to help individuals reach their goals.

Personal
I am originally from Orlando, Florida and have been in North Carolina for the last 8 years. I truly enjoy and try to take advantage of being so close to both the mountains and the beach. I also love that I get to experience all the seasons! I enjoy all things of the arts—especially live music and painting.  In my spare time, I can be found discovering new music/artists or playing with my energetic miniature poodle, Jax.


Brittney Lowery, MA, LCMHC

Staff Counselor
Pronouns: she/her/hers
lowerb@wfu.edu

Education and Training
University of North Carolina at Charlotte (B.A. in Psychology)
South University, High Point (M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling)
Internship: Daymark Recovery Services, Inc.

Clinical Interests
Crisis intervention; Group therapy; Depression; Anxiety; Trauma; Women’s mental health; Body image; Self-esteem; Assertiveness training; Communication skills; Multicultural concerns.

Counseling Style
When working with clients, I strive to foster a therapeutic relationship that will promote a positive self-esteem and ultimately assist clients in reaching their identified goals. In addition to processing barriers and ambivalence towards desired change, my goal is to provide unconditional positive regard, while identifying, and challenging, cognitive distortions that may
be triggering negative emotional and behavioral disturbances. Cultural competence is a concept that is also important to me. Our life experiences significantly impact our views of the world and how we interact with those around us. Incorporating those details in counseling can lead to a
deeper understanding of one’s development over time. Theoretical orientations that I mostly utilize are cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and a person-centered approach.

Personal
I enjoy spending time with my family and friends. As a child, I frequently traveled with my grandparents, so as an adult, I still find joy in sight-seeing and exploring new places. I love crafting and completing DIY projects. Singing is also a passion of mine and on any given Sunday, you will find me in the choir at my church.


Jessica H. Byerly, M.A., LCMHC, ATR-BC, NCC

Associate Director, Safe Office
NC Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and Nationally Board Certified Art Therapist
Pronouns: She/her/hers
bassjh@wfu.edu

Education and Training
Appalachian State University (B.S., Psychology, concentration in Human Services, minor in Art)
Lesley University (M.A., dual degree in Counseling and Art Therapy)
Internships: Dana Farber Cancer Institute; Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital

Clinical Interests
My passion lies in treating complex trauma including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Acute Stress Disorder, and complicated grief. I also have extensive experience working with individuals who experience Depression, anxiety related disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,  Bipolar Disorder, Substance Use Disorders, and psychotic and dissociative disorders.  I enjoy working with individuals with diverse identities, especially the LGBTQ+ community. 

Counseling Style
I utilize a multi-modality approach to my work with people, often blending Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, trauma informed principles and practices, EMDR, and art therapy to help individuals work towards their optimal wellness.  I am passionate about being able to incorporate non-verbal modalities such as art and principles of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy into treatment, as trauma is not held in the same part of the brain as verbal language, thus making verbal recollection and processing of trauma challenging at times.  I try to create an environment where even those who are unfamiliar with therapy will feel safe, heard, and validated in their experiences.

Personal 
I grew up in Winston-Salem and have enjoyed being back after living in other states on the east coast since 2008.  I always feel rejuvenated by being active outside and love exploring all of the nature North Carolina has to offer.  I have two dogs that bring me a lot of joy, frequent laughs, and occasional headaches.  I enjoy creating art and sewing with my vintage sewing machines.  The Muppets help remind me to not take life too seriously and I have at least 3 muppet related items in my office at any given time. 


Christopher Wilson

Christopher Wilson, Psy.D, LP, HSP-P

Assistant Director of Training
Pronouns: he/him/his
wilsonc@wfu.edu

Education & Training
University of St. Thomas (BA Music)
University of St. Thomas (MA Counseling Psychology)
Chatham University (PsyD Counseling Psychology)
Doctoral Internship: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Clinical Interests:
Group therapy, men’s mental health, identity-related concerns, shame/perfectionism/self-image, supervision and training.

Counseling Style:
I have an integrated interpersonal, cognitive-behavioral, and feminist approach to therapy. I believe that humans are wired to connect, and that loneliness, isolation, and disconnect play a significant role in mental health difficulties. I believe in the transformative power of interpersonal relationships to facilitate positive change. Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be helpful to better understand the interrelated nature of our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and to find strategies to better manage difficult emotions. I integrate a feminist approach to understand relationships in the context of intersecting identities we hold, and how our identities interact with larger systems of power, privilege, and oppression. I value discussing shared and different identities in the therapeutic relationship, as well as exploring how identities affect a person’s experience of themselves, others, and the world.

Personal:
When not at work I enjoy spending time with my partner and kids, playing and listening to music, doing anything outdoors including hiking and camping, and reading.


Rachel Burkholder, B.A.

Office Manager
Pronouns: she/her/hers
wilsonre@wfu.edu

Education: Salem College (B.A., History)

Professional
As the Office Manager for the University Counseling Center, I want to create an environment that is welcoming, helpful and comfortable for students as well as other visitors.

Personal
As a native of Winston-Salem, I enjoy the fun and entertainment this city has to offer as well as the close-knit community feel.  I enjoy reading, crocheting, cooking, arts and crafts, playing with our dog Murphy and watching movies with my son. My partner and I love to travel and spending time at the beach is our favorite.


Katherine Whitley, Psy.D., LP, HSP-P

Staff Psychologist
Outreach Coordinator
Pronouns: she, her, hers
whitleyk@wfu.edu

Education & Training
Florida State University (B.A., Psychology)
Spalding University (M.A., Clinical Psychology)
Spalding University (Psy.D., Clinical Psychology)
Internship: Appalachian State University Counseling and Psychological Services

Clinical Interests
Trauma-informed and trauma focused interventions, marginalized and minoritized populations, depression, suicide, grief, anxiety, familial/romantic/friend relationship concerns, exploring attachment style, building self-compassion, improving communication and boundary setting skills, identity exploration/development, navigating life transitions, supervision and training.

Counseling Style
My approach to therapy is rooted in building warm and trusting relationships in order to foster openness, authenticity, collaboration, and respect between myself and my clients. My theoretical orientation focuses on attachment and integrates humanistic, interpersonal, and psychodynamic approaches. I particularly enjoy narrative-based therapy and mindfulness interventions. I recognize each client is unique and may need services that are tailored specifically to their needs and therefore I draw from CBT, DBT, and ACT as well. As a clinician with various privileged identities, I think it is important to bring discussions of power, privilege, oppression, and social justice into the therapy space to deepen the therapeutic relationship and explore students’ experiences at a PWI. I believe each client is an expert on themselves and their own lived experiences and I am honored to have clients trust me with their stories.

Personal
I find my own mental health is positively impacted by spending time outside in nature, so I love long walks, hiking, and biking. I enjoy spending time with my partner, game nights with friends, curling up with my cats and a good book, and baking to satisfy my love of dessert and all things chocolate.


Adam Windham, M.A., MDiv, LCMHC-A

Staff Counselor
Pronouns: he/him/his
NC Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate
windhap@wfu.edu

Education and Training

Bucknell University (B.A., Religious Studies, B.A. History)
Wake Forest University (Master of Divinity)
Wake Forest University (M.A. Counseling)
Internship: Wake Forest University Counseling Center (Counseling), Atrium Health Carolinas Medical Center Charlotte – Main (Chaplaincy)

Clinical Interests

Substance abuse and prevention; Faith Questions and Concerns; Familial Relationships; Grief; Anxiety; Depression; College Student Wellness; Adjustment to College; Distress Tolerance; Identity Formation and Clarification; Creating Healthy Boundaries; Increasing Self Compassion; Developing Healthy Coping Mechanisms

Counseling Style

I believe that listening and providing empathy are a counselor’s greatest role and work to approach each client individually with respect and compassion. I seek to provide a safe, nonjudgmental, and comfortable space for each client in order to allow healing, trust, and growth. I utilize humanistic techniques in addition to collaborating with the client. I use eclectic orientation, with roots in Person Centered, Adlerian, Existential, Motivational Interviewing, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I firmly believe in the ability of all clients to heal and the importance of the therapeutic relationship.

Personal

I enjoy spending time with my family and friends. I grew up playing a lot of sports and being heavily involved in Scouts, and I still enjoy being outside and engaging in physical activities (particularly swimming). I love to read and watch movies, and still enjoy building Lego sets based on some of these interests. I also enjoy being part of the church community and exploring and discussing faith.


Shakira Bowman, Psy.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow
Pronouns: she, her, hers
bowmansh@wfu.edu

Education & Training
Marshall University (B.A., Psychology)
Marshall University (M.A., Clinical Psychology)
Marshall University (Psy.D. Clinical Psychology)
Internship: Applewood Centers Inc.,Cleveland OH

Clinical Interests
Marginalized populations, emerging adults, advocacy, self esteem, depression, anxiety, grief,  life transitions, identity exploration.

Counseling Style
In clinical practice, I use a combination of cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, collaborative, and humanistic techniques. The combined use of these approaches allows for flexibility to treat clients based on more individualized needs. When starting with a new client, I generally  begin with a Person-Centered approach. I strive to remain honest and upfront with my clients; through this, I promote a trusting therapeutic bond. 

Personal
Outside of work, I find happiness in traveling, laughing, spending time with family and friends, and eating delicious food.




Jesse Young, B.A.

Master’s Level Counseling Intern
Pronouns: he/him/his
younjf22@wfu.edu

Educational Background:
Clemson University (B.A. Psychology)
Wake Forest University (M.A. Counseling) – In Progress
Practicum Experience: Wake Forest University Center for Learning, Access, and Student Success (CLASS)

Clinical Interests:
Young adult populations, men’s mental health, depression, anxiety, interpersonal relationships, family dynamics, societal pressures

Counseling Style: 
I approach counseling primarily from a person-centered perspective. In the counseling space, I aim to understand clients and their perspective on the world as much as possible, while also being a support person to trust and not feel judged. I also utilize aspects of existential counseling, narrative therapy, and family systems counseling based on the needs of clients. I also have clinical experience in inpatient psychiatric settings as well as academic support.

Personal:
While I grew up in Massachusetts, I have lived up and down the East Coast. Outside of the UCC, you can find me on the golf course, working at Trader Joe’s, or cheering on my Clemson Tigers!


Our staff of licensed mental health providers, administrative support, and graduate trainees are committed to being a safe, nonjudgmental, and confidential space to all members of the Wake Forest University community.  We represent a diverse range of identities, backgrounds, and theoretical orientations –  all of which allow us to serve the range of mental health needs in our community.  If you need to talk, receive support, problem-solve, or simply want to be in the company of someone who you know will not judge you for any part of your identity, please call on us.

For Life-Threatening Emergencies

Call Anytime: 911 or 336.758.5911


For Urgent Mental Health Crises

Call Us Anytime: 336.758.5273


To Make an Appointment

Call Us During Office Hours

Monday-Friday
(8:30AM – 5PM)
336.758.5273


Crisis Assistance

For urgent mental health needs, crisis assistance is available anytime, from anywhere, by calling us at 336.758.5273.  During normal business hours, calling this number will connect you with our administrative assistant who can help assess your needs and direct you to therapy options.  After-hours and on weekends, this number will connect you with a crisis counselor.


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